2017 NUTRITION ACHIEVEMENTS

  • $8,800,000

    GRANTED

  • 492,000

    KIDS FED

  • 2,900+

    PROGRAMS

GRANT DISTRIBUTION:

2016201520142013

2016 NUTRITION ACHIEVEMENTS

  • $4,237,200

    GRANTED

  • 492,000

    KIDS FED

  • 2,100+

    PROGRAMS

• 1 in 6 Canadian Children are at risk of hunger.1
• Well-fed kids perform better at school.5
• 46% of food-insecure households choose to compromise their nutrition by eating cheaper foods.1
• Children may be particularly vulnerable to the nutritional effects of breakfast on brain activity and associated cognitive, behavioral, and academic outcomes.2
• Twenty-two studies employed academic performance measures to investigate the effects of breakfast on academic outcomes Table 2. The academic performance outcomes employed by studies included either school grades or standardized achievement tests. Twenty-one studies demonstrated that habitual breakfast (frequency and quality) have a positive effect on children and adolescents' academic performance. 3
• 66% of students who ate morning meals most days had improved problem solving skills compared to those who ate the morning meal less often or never (53%). 5
• Students who ate morning meals most days in a school week achieved better results compared to those who ate the morning meal less often or never. Differences were remarkable in the areas of independent work (70% vs. 56%), initiative (65% vs. 51%), problem solving (66% vs. 53%), and class participation (72% vs. 60%).5
• Mothers are the primary role models and teachers of cooking and food preparation skills across age and socioeconomic groups (SES), followed by school-based education.4

1.   Tarasuk, V, Mitchell, A, Dachner, N. (2016). Household food insecurity in Canada, 2014. Toronto: Research to identify policy options to reduce food insecurity (PROOF). Retrieved from http://proof.utoronto.ca (Link)
2.   Kirkpatrick, S. I., McIntyre, L., & Potestio, M. L. (2010). Child hunger and long-term adverse consequences for health. Archives of Pediatrics & Adolescent medicine, 164(8), 754-762. Retrieved from http://ucalgary.ca (Link)
3.   Adolphus Katie, Lawton Clare, Dye Louise (2013). The effects of breakfast on behavior and academic performance in children and adolescents. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience, 425. Retrieved from http://fronteirsin.org (Link)  
4.   Government of Canada (2010). Improving Cooking and Food Preparation Skills: A Synthesis of the Evidence to Inform Program and Policy Development. Retrieved from http://canada.ca (Link)
5.   Easwaramoorthy, M. (2010) Feeding Our Future: The First- and Second-Year Evaluation. Toronto District School Board.  Retrieved from http://tdsb.on.ca (Link)